Back a Spudder!

Kellen Bringhurst of Ridgefield High School is running for the Fall Sports Prep Athlete of the Week sponsored by the Columbian newspaper. Every week the Columbian asks its readers to vote on their favorite prep athlete from six choices.

Let’s make Kellen a winner. His sport is golf, and he shot a 2-over-par 74 to win the 2AGSHL championship at Lewis River.

Vote for Kellen at www.columbian.com/poll. Vote ends at 8 pm Thursday.

Getting ready for the Book Sale

These people worked hard today moving books and getting ready for the Friends of the Ridgefield Library’s Used Book Sale. This is one of our big fund raisers and we’re hoping everyone in town comes to check out the 1,000’s of books and buy a batch.

Sale to members starts Thursday at 6 pm, with a reception and early bird sale, then continues Friday and Saturday, opening at 11 am and closing Friday at 7 pm and Saturday and 3 pm.

Not a member? Join at the sale – the dues are only $15 and are good thru 2019. Already a member? Re-up your membership and pay the current price – cost goes up in January.

Billy Griffith Memorial Campaign

Billy Griffith was struck by a vehicle and killed October 11, 2018.  Billy was a 2017 Ridgefield high school graduate who was attending school at the University of Washington.  A Memorial will be held October 20, 2018 at 1:00 p.m. at Faith Baptist Church in Hazel Dell.  A Go-Fund-Me Campaign has been set up in Billy Griffith’s name to help his family with funeral costs.  Please donate and keep Billy’s family in your prayers.   ~ Contributed by Pamela Lehto

Ridgefield Main Street Meeting

Please join the Ridgefield Main Street group Thursday, October 18 at 8:30 am to hear Mayor Don Stose update us on happenings and plans in the city.

Meeting is at the Sportsman’s Steakhouse and Saloon, 121 N Main Ave. Complimentary coffee is served, and breakfast is available.

It’s SOCKtober!

Socktober is a nationwide movement to collect socks for homeless shelters.  Socks are one of the most needed but least often donated items at shelters.  Students from Stephanie Brown’s class at Union Ridge Elementary are helping fill that gap with their own Socktober drive.  Their goal is to collect 1,000 pairs of socks for the Council for the Homeless in Vancouver.

Many of the students in the RISE (Reaching Independence through Structured Education) program are on the autism spectrum, and the students are running every element of the program.  The students visited each classroom in the school to place donation bags.  RISE teacher Stephanie Brown said, “They went into classrooms to say a few words, which can be difficult for them.  They handed out the bags and were able to say, ‘This is for socks.  Thank you.’”

Savanhy Virakitti and Bruce Kizim collect donated socks for their Socktober drive.

Every day, the RISE students walk around school with a big wagon to collect donations.  Then they sort the socks and graph donations to keep track.  It has been part of their curriculum in other ways as well.  They have read books about homelessness, and they colored the posters promoting Socktober around the school.  Using the Socktober drive across multiple subjects has helped reinforce their learning.  “It’s awesome to see the concepts starting to sink in,” Brown said.

Students decorated the wagon used for collecting socks.

“But my biggest drive is to show them that anybody and everybody can make a difference,” Brown explained.  “We have some of the most impacted students in our district, and here they are doing something fantastic and wonderful. “

Socktober runs through the month of October.  If you’d like to drop off new socks for the Socktober drive, please leave them at the Union Ridge Elementary School office.

Watercolor Class Starts October 30

Sample of student’s work

Unleash your creativity in a relaxed, positive atmosphere and watch your amazement grow as you create an original water color painting.

Our next series of watercolor classes start Tuesday, October 30 from 9 to 11 am at my home studio in downtown Ridgefield. Lots of individual instruction for a small group of students.

Cost is $60 for a series of six lessons. Call today to register – this class fills up quickly and is limited in size. 360-887-2160 or kathywinters179@gmail.com.

Thought for the Week

Sounds like Fun!

Interested in doing a marathon but not in one day? Join us for the inaugural Couch Potato Run organized by the Ridgefield High School cheer team. Run, walk, hike, jog and keep track of your miles. Then on Nov 10th at RHS come at noon to run your final 1.2 miles.

http://spudderactivities.weebly.com/cheer.html

Meet a Local Merchant

This is one of a series of articles about local stores.

John Rose Real Estate recently moved into downtown Ridgefield because John felt the time was right to bring a real estate office downtown. He grew up on a local dairy farm and takes great pride in servicing local people.

Rose Real Estate offers residential appraisal and real estate service with a focus on Ridgefield and North Clark County properties. There are two appraisers and five realtors working out of the office, and offer a free analysis of your property. Rose Realty is located at 414 Pioneer Avenue in the building shown above.

John is an active member of our community – he serves on the Ridgefield Chamber of Commerce Board and is vice-commander of the Ridgefield American Legion Post 44.

If you would like your business profiled on FYI98642.com, give me a shout: kathywinters179@gmail.com. I’ll send you a form to fill out with the information you’d like included. There is no cost to this service.

City has Openings

The City of Ridgefield announces openings on several commissions: Planning Commission, Parks Board, Civil Service Commission, Safety Commission, and the Arts Commissions. If you are interested in volunteering in one of these groups, there’s more information on the city website, here.

Applications may be obtained by contacting City Clerk at 360-887-3557,

julie.ferriss@ci.ridgefield.wa.us or City Website www.ridgefieldwa.us.

Sale to Benefit Family Resource Center

Barb Blystone of The Mercantile store is having a Fall Sale and Cold Weather Clothing Drive to benefit the Ridgefield Family Resource Center on Friday and Saturday, October 12 and 13 from 10am to 5pm. Come out and pick up a gift for the upcoming holidays from her vast stock of creative and thoughtful items.

Bring a coat, hat or gloves for a local child, or donate money for the RFRC.

The sale is at her home, located across from the Carty section of Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge at 28823 NW Main Ave in Ridgefield. There will be a sign near the driveway.

Details on Fall Used Book Sale

The Friends of the Ridgefield Library’s Fall Used Book Sale is coming up soon!

Here are the details:

Thursday (10/19) from 6 to 8 pm: Members-Only Appreciation Reception and Early Access to the sale. If you want to become a new member or are renewing your membership, fill out the membership form in advance or at the door. Membership prices are going up next year, but if you join or re-join before the end of the year you’ll pay this year’s lower price.

There will be delicious treats for you to savor while you browse the tables and shelves packed with books, two raffles for a free bag of books, and many great door prizes. The Reception is in the small room of the Community Center and the used book sale is in the large room.

Friday (10/20) from 11 am to 7 pm: The sale is open to members and the public. Anyone may still join the Friends! This year, we are having a “Marketplace” in the small room of the Community Center (where you will be paying for your purchases). You will find a variety of A+ gift items for that special “someone” for the holidays (or any day).

Saturday (10/21) from 11 am to 3: pm: Same as Friday, only the hours are shorter. There may be a special sale the last hour. You’ll have to come on down to find out!

As always, we appreciate everyone who comes along and buys “merch” that helps fund our current library and goes towards the building project for our new library.

We also are in need of helping hands to set up before, staff, and clean up after this major event. If you have even an hour or two and feel like making a difference in your community, please contact Jeanne at (360) 887-2579 or jeanne.androvich@mindspring.com

European Praying Mantis

 

If you’re a grasshopper this mantis  could be the last thing you see.  An ambush predator, mantises snatch their prey in those spiny forearms, and eat them alive.  European praying mantises are not native to our area but have become quite common.  They likely were introduced to help control pests.  In the past,  Fred Meyer has   sold mantis egg cases  in their garden stores.  Their value for controlling garden pests is questionable.  They disperse  after hatching, are cannibals, and eat good insects such as honey bees.

They hatch in spring, and after several molts become winged adults around the first of September.  Mantises are well known for their cannibalistic tendencies with many articles and nature documentaries showing the female devouring her smaller mate.  It may not be quite like that.  After all, a female mantis must at least have a mate if she is to have offspring and to do that she has to allow a male to climb onto her back.  Mating takes a long time, several hours.

The Nazarene Church across the street from  me used to have floodlights to light up the east side of the building.  The bright lights would attract the newly emerged adult mantises the first week of September.  A few years ago I collected three males and a female from the side of the church.  I put them all in a Styrofoam ice chest.  The next day, when I took off the lid I found all three males on the female’s back.  One was on the center and the other two were off to each side.  No body was eating anybody and they all were quiet.  Later, when I looked again,  one of the males was mating with the female and the other two were still in the chest but no longer with the female.  The virgin female likely puts  out a pheromone that helps males find her.  It may attenuate not only her behavior but that of the males as well.  Suppressing predatory behavior then facilitates successful mating.  After mating, the female can resume her predatory behavior and if the male hangs around too long she may eat him.

I’ve had the female in the above photo for a week or so.  She deposited an egg case on the side of a glass container.  It should contain over 100 eggs or so.  If you look carefully as you walk around Ridgefield, you may find one.  Ones on fences and fence posts are easier to find.  They are about one inch long.   Next spring the young will wriggle out of the egg case and dangle on slender threads as  their bodies harden.  Then, they need to get away from each other.

Contributed by Paul Snoey

 

 

 

Ridgefield School District Honors October Employee and Students of the Month

On October 9, Ridgefield School District officials recognized the October Employee and Students of the Month at the regular Board of Directors meeting.

The Employee of the Month is Tamara Hoodenpyl, teacher at Ridgefield High School.  Tami Hoodenpyl, in her four years as art teacher at Ridgefield High School, has involved herself in the school as much as, if not more than any other teacher.  She is an exceptional teacher who challenges her students to excel.  Her classrooms are engaging, thoughtful, and inclusive.  This past summer, Tami, along with an RHS science teacher, spent the summer in Mallorca, Spain, participating in an archeological dig.  Her pottery class is now teaming up with that science teacher’s chemistry class to better understand how ancient art interconnects with science.

Tamara Hoodenpyl

In addition to her teaching duties, Tami has been the head cheer coach, the art club advisor, a class advisor, an assistant director to the school’s annual musical, a student-chaperone on a music trip to Disneyland, a lead teacher in the planning of Spudder Day, and is currently the National Honor Society advisor.  Tami uses her spare time to work toward her National Board Certification.

While it is difficult to pare down the exceptional staff we have at RHS to nominate just one person, Tami Hoodenpyl is certainly worthy of this honor and is representative of the many outstanding employees at Ridgefield High School.

Students of the Month

Hyde Zier, a third grader, is October’s Student of the Month at South Ridge Elementary School.  One staff member describes Hyde best.  “Hyde Zier is brand new to South Ridge this year, but you would never know it because he has transitioned beautifully!  Since the first day of school, he has shown what it means to be respectful, responsible, and safe. Hyde has a smile on his face and a positive attitude as soon as he steps into the classroom every day, and I never see it leave, even when he steps onto his bus. He is extremely respectful to all his peers and teachers and follows the expectations without any reminders.  Hyde is very responsible and is always helping his teacher or his classmates (happily too!) just out of the kindness of his heart.  He shows resilience because he is a problem solver and never gives up, always with a smile.  Hyde is a true role model to his peers and deserves to be recognized.”

Hyde Zier

Jayden Garcia-Bernal, a second grader, was selected at Union Ridge Elementary.  The Union Ridge teachers and staff are very proud of Jayden.  They write, “Jayden is very deserving of the student of the month award.  He exemplifies the three “R”s of respect, responsibility, and resilience.  Jayden is very respectful of other students, teachers, and staff at Union Ridge.  We can always count on Jayden to be responsible, kind, and helpful in the classroom, as well as on the playground.  He is a hard working student and never gives up.  Union Ridge Elementary’s Student of the Month award for second grade is well-earned by Jayden Garcia-Bernal.”

Jayden Garcia-Bernal

April Carvel, a sixth grader, is October’s Student of the Month at Sunset Ridge Intermediate School.  The Sunset Ridge teachers and staff are very proud of April.  They write, “April is a motivated student who always finds a way to smile in every situation. This year did not start as smoothly as anyone would have liked, and my split classroom has had more than its share of hiccups. April has shown resilience every day by finding the positive in every situation that has come up and been flexible in her schedule changes, despite not seeing her peers as often as she would have liked. She has made the best of eating lunch and having recess with a different grade level by seeking her fifth grade brother and spending time with him and reaching out and making new friendships with the students from other grades and has been helpful to the students who are new to Sunset. In every lesson and transition, April can be counted on to do the right thing, make the right choice, and is ready to learn.  She fully engages and participates and is a motivated learner.”

April Carvel

Andrew Wilken, an eighth grader, was chosen at View Ridge Middle School.  The View Ridge teachers and staff are very proud of Andrew.  They write, “Andrew Wilken is View Ridge Middle School’s Student of the Month.  Andrew is a strong addition to the classroom.  He regularly shows genuine interest in others, including his fellow students.  He is admired and respected among his peers and is always courteous.  Andrew consistently contributes to a positive learning environment and maintains high expectations of himself.  He is a valued student leader at our school. As an ASB class representative, Andrew contributes ideas and laughter to our meetings and events.  He is helpful to others around him, and his kindness goes a long way.”

Andrew Wilken

Grace Melbuer, a junior, was chosen from Ridgefield High School.  The Ridgefield High School teachers and staff are very proud of Grace.  They write, “Grace is a student who is tenacious in her quest for knowledge, is a very strong leader, and is always willing to pitch in to help.”  Another teacher says of Grace, “I love her enthusiasm for learning.” Grace is involved in the zero-hour teaching academy class which requires her to be here at 7:00 AM every morning.  She takes four (!) AP classes as well as Spanish III, and is involved in HOSA, Spudder Ambassadors, and National Honor Society.  She is also a member of the RHS soccer and track teams.  Ridgefield High School is very pleased to select Grace Melbuer as October 2018 Student of the Month.

Grace Melbuer

Ridgefield School District is grateful to its sponsor, the historic Sportsman’s Restaurant and Lounge, a local Ridgefield business owned and operated by Terry Hurd.  This is the fifth year that Hurd has provided funding to support the district’s recognition program.

Family Legacy at Cispus Outdoor School

Cispus Outdoor School has been a Ridgefield tradition for 49 years.  Every year, fifth grade students hop on buses and travel to the Cispus Outdoor Learning Center in the Gifford Pinchot National Forest.  They spend a week doing all their classes outdoors, hiking, learning survival skills, and gathering around huge campfires.  And for nearly all of those 49 years, one family has been an important part of its legacy.

Vintage photo of Cispus camp (circa 1930’s). Photo courtesy of Cispus Outdoor School.

Cispus started 49 years ago with John Hudson, the principal at Union Ridge Elementary.  Carla Bonebrake, the health aide at Union Ridge, remembered being part of the inaugural class.  “I was in the first fifth grade class to go,” she said. “We would sleep out in the fields, out under the stars!”  Now, many years later, she attends Cispus as support staff; this is her eleventh year working with the program.  “You know,” she said, “the feeling of being up there is exactly the same.  Very little has changed.  The cabin I stayed in, Dogwood, is still there, still the same.”

Soon after the program started, Bonebrake’s mother, Allene Wodaege, worked with John Hudson to manage Cispus.  Over the years, she taught classes, implemented training for counselors, and then took over management of the program.  Wodaege spent 25 years leading Cispus for the Ridgefield School District.

Allene Wodaege and Cispus counselor with Ridgefield students leaving for Cispus Outdoor School.

When asked what she is most proud of, Wodaege said, “What it instills in the children and the counselors.  Not only knowledge, but their exposure to the out of doors, what it holds and what it can do for all of them, touching nature and being part of it.”  It’s a transformative experience that has impacted generations of students.

As this year’s Cispus class prepared to board the buses, Bonebrake worked with the students inside.  And Wodaege greeted the students outside.  She was glad to see them continuing the tradition she helped start so many years ago.  Wodaege said, “You just put the kids out into a learning environment and hope that they are going to learn and take that knowledge with them.  It’s a stepping stone.”