A Final Word on I-1531

Tuesday of  this week is  the final day for voting. Many election issues seem very mean spirited and ugly this year.  In any case, it will  soon be over.   Initiative I-1531 was looking good in the polls at the beginning of October. However, the campaign against this initiative has now spent more than 31.5 million dollars and it has been almost all the big oil companies.  They have all those ads on TV and the big glossy mailers telling everyone how unfair it is and how much more we are all going to pay.  The reason big oil is fighting this initiative is because they see it as a threat.

We must stop increasing the levels of CO2 in our atmosphere and in our oceans.  The report issued  On October  by the International Panel On Climate Change  stated that we need to act very soon, within the next 12 years, to avoid some very serious consequences.  The Journal Nature published a new study on October 31 that says  that the amount of heat being put into our oceans is underestimated by as much as 60% and it will be even harder to meet the goals of the Paris Accords.

A comment about what the graph at the top of the page shows:   The level of CO2 is now well over 400 parts/million.  It is increasing at about 5% each decade.  The resident time of CO2 in the atmosphere is a very long time.  Even if we completely stop putting CO2 in the atmosphere, the level of CO2 will stay above 400 PPM for some time.  There is a lag time between adding CO2 into the atmosphere and oceans and its effects.  Thus, we need to act very soon.

One of the arguments against I-1531 is that it will raise rates.  But considering the future costs of not doing anything at all, that does not seem so bad.  If I 1531 turns out to be terrible, something can always be done, including an initiative to repeal it.  If we wait too long with emissions, there will be no repeal.

Contributed by Paul Snoey

About Paul Snoey

I have a degree in Biology and Environmental Science from WSU Vancouver
I am very fond of Gee Creek and Allen Canyon Creek and do a lot of volunteer work to restore these creeks.

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