About Paul Snoey

I have a degree in Biology and Environmental Science from WSU Vancouver
I am very fond of Gee Creek and Allen Canyon Creek and do a lot of volunteer work to restore these creeks.

More on North Main Avenue Construction

The photo above was taken last Thursday.  The reflection of the arched dome has created an illusion that the culvert is a complete circle.  Because the worksite was flooded all week,the contractors were unable to work.  Later on Thursday, a larger pump was brought in and it began pumping down the area on Friday.  By Saturday morning, the level of water had dropped about 3 feet or more.  Another large pump was brought in Saturday morning.  Sunday was a day of heavy rain and by tonight my rain gauge had 1.18 inches of rain.  The watershed for Gee Creek is 8.7 square miles.  A one inch rain on the watershed dumps 150 million gallons or more.  Some of this water is soaked into the ground  or stored in ponds and wetlands or storm water facilities.  The water that makes it to the creek can only go through the North Main Avenue crossing.  With the extra pumping today, the water level stayed about the same.  The National Weather Service is predicting another round of heavy rain early Tuesday.  This could be a real problem:  The high flows on the creek today will not have much time to drain the watershed before the next storm and the ground is beginning to be soaked increasing the amount of runoff.   September is a month of transition from summer into fall.  Occasionally, early autumn storms can arrive.  This year has been unusually stormy so far and is making things difficult for the project.  It is a little ironic that this project should prevent any future flooding on North  Main Avenue but is being delayed by a flooded worksite.

 

 

 

 

Flooded Worksite

 

The work area is flooded halting work on the section of N Main Ave and Gee Creek.  The work area is dependent on a pump to move water upstream to down stream of the work area.  We have had some heavy rain yesterday through this morning. The staff gauge in Abrams Park showed a flow of 70 cubic feet/second or 31,000 gallons a minute.  It is much too much for the pump and the creek has backed up almost to Heron Ridge Drive.  There will be some  more rain this week and flows should stay higher for a while.  Usually flows are less than 5 cubic feet/second in late summer.

~ Contributed by Paul Snoey

The End of The Drought

A couple of years ago I had mentioned to Kathy Winters that I had seen a garter snake chasing some fish in a pond that had almost gone dry.  With the long summer drought, the same pond has only a few inches of water left again this year.  In driving by a few days ago, there was another snake in the pond and I could see lots of movement from what I  thought were fish.  I was curious and came back with a bucket of water and a net.  A couple of scoops and these creatures were in the net.  I took a few home and put them in an aquarium.  I took the above photo and grabbed a field guide.  These are larval long toed salamanders.  These are what the garter snake was after.  They are very fast swimmers and could avoid a garter snake.  But as the pond got drier they were becoming more vulnerable.

The photo above is of Allen Canyon creek.  This creek had stopped flowing several weeks ago.  There are a few pools like this and the Coho fry released from the incubator are stranded.  This afternoon, we had two heavy rain showers and they dropped almost an inch of rain.  It may be enough to get the creek flowing again and save these fish.   I may be able to stop watering trees along Gee Creek if it rains just a little more.  Perhaps Autumn is a little early this year.

 

 

N Main Ave Reconstruction

 

North Main Avenue has been closed from Depot Street to the entrance of the Carty Unit of the refuge since  the July  4th  week-end.  The old 10 foot  diameter corrugated  metal culvert has been removed, much material excavated, and a great deal of rock and sand imported.  There  has been  a steady stream of trucks going in and out for several weeks.  By midweek the area for the new culvert had been prepared and trucks began delivering the components to build the footings.  There are 8  pieces, each weighing  55,000 lbs.
The footing pieces for the South side were placed Wednesday and the pieces for the North side were to be placed as well.  However, there  is a problem with the crane and as of Friday evening the crane is sitting quietly and the pieces of the footing are still uninstalled.  The groove running down the middle of the footing will be where the precast arched dome will be set.  The interior pieces of the footing have rebar sticking out of them.  Forms have been built and will be filled with concrete.  This will make for a solid footing.  One of the workers stated the plan is to lower the arched dome next week.  However, this was before the problem with the crane happened.  At 3:30 PM today there were no workers on site.  It’s likely the crane must be repaired before work can be resumed. Since each piece of footing weighs more than 27 tons, it is easy to see why.

Climate Change Revisited

 

The graph above is the latest Monthly graph (May) for 2019.  The peaks for each year are always  in May. As growth begins in the northern hemisphere, it begins to take CO2 out of the atmosphere thus  the dip seen each year.  The increase each year from month to month is due to the burning of fossil fuels.  The difference between May 2019 and May 2018 is 3.6 PPM.  All the months so far in 2019, are above 3.0 PPM, a large increase.  The three biggest carbon emitters in the world are the US, China, and India.  The US increased it’s CO2 emissions in 2018 by 2.5%,  China by 4.7 %, and India by 6.3%.   The world as a whole increased it’s CO2 emissions by 2.7% compared to 2017.  So, the world is increasing emissions of CO2 instead of reducing emissions, reversing a trend the last few years.  The reason is economic growth of all three countries.  China is relying on coal for producing electricity, as is India, even though both are making strides in alternative energy sources.

 

The graph above is of the increase each year of CO2  from 1960 through 2018.  The black bars represent the average for the decade.  It is notable that the first decade averaged less than 1.0 ppm, while the decade beginning in 2000 averaged almost 2.0ppm. As mentioned above, so far in 2019, the monthly averages are over 3 ppm higher than last year.  If that trend continues, then 2019 could be the highest yearly average ever.  2019 will be the last year of the decade.  If the average is 3 ppm, then the decade will average about 2.5 ppm.  So, it’s clear that we are increasing emissions of CO2 rather than decreasing.

GLOBAL AVERAGE TEMPERATURE BY YEAR:  1850 TO 2018

The colorful stripes above represent the temperature of the earth over the past 168years.  Each stripe is one year and the colors from blue to red represent cooler to warmer.   This graph was obtained from a “Show your Stripes” website.  It shows in an elegant manner the rise in temperature of our planet in the last few decades.  The last few decades have been notable for record heat, cold, rain,  drought, hurricanes, and typhoons.  The signature of  a warming world due to an ever increasing amount of CO2 into the atmosphere is strong.

I recently read about the winter that Lewis and Clark and company spent at Fort Clatsop.   They were miserable.  They were tired of eating mostly elk meat.  They must have been dirty and stinky.  They were wet because it rained all the time.  They were happy to break camp in the spring and head up the Columbia River and home.  It was the beginning of the modern age that began with the industrial revolution in England.  The age we’re in now is largely fueled by fossil fuels.  I could think about our explorers in the modern age.  After a day in the field they could come back to, let’s say, a hotel, take a hot shower,  and put on clean clothes.  Then, while drinking a cold beer, Meriwether Lewis could write up a report and e-mail it to Thomas Jefferson.    Then, they could fly back home.  The point is that the modern world is wonderful.  However, we are not paying the social and environmental cost associated with it.  The climate scientists are telling us that we must stop putting CO2 into the atmosphere.  To do that we must stop burning fossil fuels.  Some climate scientists are saying that not only must we stop emitting CO2, but we must begin removing it.   That would be tough.  It will be tough enough just to slow emissions.  CO2 has a long residence time in the atmosphere and the level of CO2 in the atmosphere now will have consequences that last hundreds if not a thousand years.  It is unlikely that we can change our minds in the future and undo the ongoing changes.  The best we can do is to slow the changes down.   However, there is great resistance to doing that and I’m doubtful that we will but there is always hope.  Many people are working  hard to make a difference.

contributed by Paul Snoey

Woody Debris in Lake River

This morning’s incoming tide carried  a stream of woody debris in Lake River. The woody material likely was deposited in Lake River and the Columbia from the flooding we had in February. The high water this week set a lot of it in motion.  A lot of debris jammed up against the fire department boat-house and this morning personnel were working to push it away from the entrance.   The tide crested about 10:30 AM and then Lake river should reverse flow.  The tide will come in again Friday morning and Lake River and the Columbia should crest at just over 13 feet tomorrow morning,  Then, the rivers should begin to drop.  For a few days, we can expect this debris to create jams at  the marina and the boat launch.

HUNDRED YEAR FLOOD

We had some slushy snow and rain Sunday night followed by heavy rain beginning Monday afternoon. I had about about 1.5 inches Monday and 2 inches more by 11 AM Tuesday in my rain gauge. The staff gauge on the footbridge in Abrams Park read about 9.7 feet for a flow of  1150 cubic feet/second Tuesday morning,  Unofficially, we had a 100 year rain event and a 100 year flood on Gee Creek. Public works was called out early to deal with flooding issues. Pioneer Street just east of Gee Creek had mud and debris flows and the bottom of Riemann Road was underwater as the culvert going across Pioneer backed up. North Main Avenue was closed at Depot Street as water ran across the road and formed a waterfall on the other side. The park Caretakers residence and outbuildings were flooded from a large flow where the creek had jumped its banks upstream.  It made a mess for a while but it was short lived.  By early evening the flood waters had receded and both North Main Avenue and Riemann Road were open.

The photo above is of the flood plain just below the Heron Ridge Bridge

The Gee Creek Trail at Heron Ridge was under some very fast moving water

The Park Caretakers residence and outbuildings were flooded.  City crews and court corrections crews worked to build a sandbag dike.

North Main Avenue was underwater until Tuesday Evening.  A larger culvert will be constructed later and this section of roadway will be raised above flood levels

   

Riemann Road near Pioneer was underwater for several hours.  There is a culvert that goes under both Pioneer and Bertsinger Road that is not large enough to handle extreme flows.

The remote site incubator normally sits a few feet off the creek.  It has 60,000 Coho eggs and fry in it and I thought they would be lost.  However, this morning I was able to get down there, restore flow, and clean the sediment off the eggs. There did not appear to be any mortality.  I visited the RSI on Allen Canyon Creek yesterday with Les Greear and that one is OK as well.

 

 

 

 

Union Ridge Giants

 

If you walk to Union Ridge School on N 8th Avenue, you will be greeted by some giant Douglas Fir trees at the end of the street.  The largest, to the left in the photo, is 145 feet  tall and is 19 feet in circumference at chest height.  It is the largest of some very big trees here and being among them is a pleasure.  Myrna Mills, a former deputy city clerk for the City of Ridgefield, said that when she was a student at Union Ridge, she and other students planted some of these trees.

The Carnegie Institute of Ecology at Stanford University did a study of carbon uptake in forests.  Their conclusion was that 25% of man made carbon dioxide emissions  are taken up by the world’s forests.  It makes sense to preserve and protect forests and trees.   In the United States, Pacific Northwest forests are the best at removing carbon from the atmosphere.  Douglas firs can live over a thousand years and can rival redwoods and giant Sequoias in size.  In addition to their beauty, trees clean the air, provide cooling, and remove carbon dioxide from the air.

Ridgefield has a lot of trees.  When I am in the Carty Unit near Lake River and look  back into town, there are so many trees I can barely make out the houses.  There are many places in Ridgefield  where more trees can be planted so let’s  do that.

Contributed by Paul Snoey

 

Salmon Incubator Set Up

Contributed by Paul Snoey

The Remote Site Incubator was set up on Riemann Road early last week and on Jan 3rd, 10,000 Coho eggs were placed in a basket on top of the incubator.  As can be seen in the photo below,  the embryos have developed eyes.  They will need a few more weeks before hatching.  After hatching,  they will stay in the incubator for a month or so and when ready, will swim out of the overflow.  They will disperse downstream and spread themselves out along the creek as far as the refuge.  They will stay in Gee Creek for about one year and then head down the Columbia River and into the Pacific Ocean.  Of course, the odds of coming back are very small.

 

 

 

 

 

A little More on Shiny Geranium

The photos  below were  taken in early June of 2017 at the  South bound Gee Creek Rest Stop on I-5.  It is of an area taken over by shiny geranium.  The plants are about 18″ high and  loaded with flowers and seed pods.  It’s incredible ability to produce seeds sets it apart from other geraniums and  other weed species.   Each flower can produce a seed pod containing five spring loaded seeds that can be thrown several yards.  This ability is why it can be such  a problem.  It is on Pioneer street now and North Main Avenue and a few other places around town.  There were six acres on a property north of town that were taken over and I have  worked with the property owner for two years now to eliminate it.  I visited that property today as well as Pioneer Street and a couple of other places and can see that trying to eliminate it has not worked.

 

A New Year’s Surprise

This morning was freezing and foggy.  Frost can make for interesting photographs so I took some photos around town then headed for the refuge.  Frost on leaves and stems makes for interesting highlights in photographs. Getting some fresh air and exercise felt good too.  I took several photos making for the north end of the Oaks to Wetlands Trail.  In looking off the trail, I saw a large patch of green to the side and recognized it as a patch of shiny geraniums.   Then, I found several other patches in the area.  This is not a good thing.  I’ve worked very hard the past two years trying to eliminate it and to keep it out of the watershed.  I’ve found it at the post office and a few other places in town and thought it was under control.   If there is this much in this area, then it must certainly be in other areas of the refuge.

This little geranium can completely cover the ground.  It can smother all the other native plants.  It’s just getting started along this section of the Carty unit but will spread very quickly and will likely take over the entire area.  To eliminate  it will take an extraordinary effort.  The photo below is of an area of small carrot like plants being invaded by a few shiny geraniums.  In a year or two, this area will likely be a dense carpet of geraniums and many of the small native plants will be gone

Contributed by Paul Snoey

 

Winter Solstice Today

 

Winter begins this afternoon at 2;23 PM. It is the shortest daylight day of the year.  Sunrise today was at 7:48 AM and Sunset will be at 4:28PM. For those of us that don’t like the cold, dark, and wet so much, it is good news.  It means that the days will begin to be longer each day.  By the end of January, sunset will be noticeably later; Almost 50 minutes later than now and we should see the first hints that spring is coming.

Contributed by Paul Snoey

Ridgefield Gets Storm Water Grant

 Storm water discharge at the Heron Ridge Bridge  (Oct,  2013)

On Friday, the 7th of December, The Lower Columbia Fish Recovery Board made it’s final listing of Projects for the Clark County Clean Water Fund.  The CCCWF  has $689,120 available for projects this year.  There were seven applications for projects and Ridgefield’s Heron Ridge Storm Water Pond project was ranked the highest of the seven project applications.   The money was able to fund six of the seven projects.

The city was given $150,000 in grant funding  and will match $125,000 in Real Estate Excise Tax.  The city is negotiating with the property owner where the facility will be located and the city has budgeted $60,000 for it’s purchase.  The old town storm water main passes through this property already.   The design of the facility is nearing completion and construction is expected to be finished by the end of October next year

Old Town Ridgefield has approximately 12 acres between Pioneer Street to Division Street and from North fifth Avenue to North Main Avenue.  These blocks drain into a storm water main that discharges into Gee Creek at the Heron Ridge Bridge. This  untreated storm water is the largest source of storm water pollution for the city.  Treating this storm water will improve water quality in Gee Creek, especially during low summer flows when the creek is less able to dilute a sudden discharge.

Last spring, the remote site incubator on Riemann Road put 60,000 Coho Salmon fry  into Gee Creek and there exists a native population of Coastal Cutthroat trout.  The fry of both species have been seen above and below the Heron Ridge area.   Treating storm water before it enters the creek protects these fish from being exposed to a variety of pollutants.

Contributed by Paul Snoey

 

 

 

 

 

Today is the Last Day to Vote

The photo above is the ballot box located just east of the freeway.  It’s in the middle of the cul-de-sac just North of Pioneer Street by the restaurant and gas station.  Ballots can be deposited until 8 PM this evening.  Mail in ballots need to be postmarked with todays date to be valid.  Ballots need to be in the Ridgefield post office by 5 PM today.  People with mail delivery need to have their ballots in the mail box before the regular delivery time.

A Final Word on I-1531

Tuesday of  this week is  the final day for voting. Many election issues seem very mean spirited and ugly this year.  In any case, it will  soon be over.   Initiative I-1531 was looking good in the polls at the beginning of October. However, the campaign against this initiative has now spent more than 31.5 million dollars and it has been almost all the big oil companies.  They have all those ads on TV and the big glossy mailers telling everyone how unfair it is and how much more we are all going to pay.  The reason big oil is fighting this initiative is because they see it as a threat.

We must stop increasing the levels of CO2 in our atmosphere and in our oceans.  The report issued  On October  by the International Panel On Climate Change  stated that we need to act very soon, within the next 12 years, to avoid some very serious consequences.  The Journal Nature published a new study on October 31 that says  that the amount of heat being put into our oceans is underestimated by as much as 60% and it will be even harder to meet the goals of the Paris Accords.

A comment about what the graph at the top of the page shows:   The level of CO2 is now well over 400 parts/million.  It is increasing at about 5% each decade.  The resident time of CO2 in the atmosphere is a very long time.  Even if we completely stop putting CO2 in the atmosphere, the level of CO2 will stay above 400 PPM for some time.  There is a lag time between adding CO2 into the atmosphere and oceans and its effects.  Thus, we need to act very soon.

One of the arguments against I-1531 is that it will raise rates.  But considering the future costs of not doing anything at all, that does not seem so bad.  If I 1531 turns out to be terrible, something can always be done, including an initiative to repeal it.  If we wait too long with emissions, there will be no repeal.

Contributed by Paul Snoey