About Paul Snoey

Some Information about Climate Change

The climate changes we are experiencing are serious and need action to be done soon, even yesterday.  This posting  is a follow up to the post done a few days ago.  The next post will discuss some of the changes that are  likely already happening in Ridgefield and what is likely to happen in the future—Paul Snoey

 

First: The site below is an ingenious animation of  the history of the levels of carbon dioxide on our planet for the last 800,000 years.   It plots carbon dioxide levels at points from the South Pole on the left of the screen to the North Pole on the Right of the screen,  There is a great deal of information in this animation.  Please don’t hesitate to pause or watch it again.

https://www.esrl.noaa.gov/gmd/ccgg/trends/history.html

 

Second:  “Climate Change: Evidence and Causes is a jointly produced publication of The US National Academy of Sciences and The Royal Society. Written by a UK-US team of leading climate scientists and reviewed by climate scientists and others, the publication is intended as a brief, readable reference document for decision makers, policy makers, educators, and other individuals seeking authoritative information on the some of the questions that continue to be asked.”  From this site you can watch on-line or download.  It’s interesting that this was published in 2014.  It’s 2017 and some things are already different.  For example, C02 has increased a bit.

https://www.nap.edu/catalog/18730/climate-change-evidence-and-causes

Third:  A discussion from Wikipedia about the global warming controversy

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Global_warming_controversy

Fourth:  The last site is given with  reluctance.   It is not good news.  It says that the changes we have set in motion are going to persist for a very long time, even if  all  climate changing emissions are immediately stopped.  As bad as that is, it will be much worse if nothing is done at all.

http://theconversation.com/what-would-happen-to-the-climate-if-we-stopped-emitting-greenhouse-gases-today-35011

 

 

 

 

Climate Change and Carbon Dioxide

Mauna Loa CO2

Measurement of Atmospheric CO2 at the Summit of Mauna Loa in Hawaii since 1957

Since the beginning of the industrial revolution, the level of global carbon dioxide has increased  40%.  It is increasing at more than 5% a decade, and  in spite of a lot of discussion and proposed actions, the increase is unabated.  It is higher than it has been in more than eight hundred thousand years.  As a result of the increase the worlds ocean  temperatures has risen  on average 1.1 degrees Fahrenheit and the land   temperature has risen an average of  1.4 degrees Fahrenheit.  Much of the increase has occurred since 1970.  There is really little  debate in the scientific communities worldwide that the cause of the increase is mostly due to the increase in carbon dioxide.

Three Hurricanes in the Atlantic this year were categories 4 or 5.  Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria were very destructive.  All formed over waters that  were warmer than average.  Hurricanes and typhoons get their energy by removing heat from ocean water.  With higher sea surface temperatures these storms can rapidly intensify.  If the water is warmer at higher latitudes they can stay stronger.  Hurricane Ophelia became a category 3 hurricane in the northeast Atlantic and did great damage to Ireland.  It was the strongest hurricane  ever to form in the northeast Atlantic.

On land,  many areas are having record heat and drought.  In our area, the years 2009 , 2015, and 2017 had the highest numbers of days with temperatures over 90 degrees.  The extended summer drought  and heat in the Columbia River Gorge set the stage for a fire that began on September 2nd and burned an area almost 50,000 acres.  The fires in Northern and Southern California burned thousands of homes and killed dozens of people.  Like here,  California experienced an extremely hot summer.  Portugal and Spain have had terrible wildfires that have killed  well over 100 people.  In the rest of the European Union,  the number of fires has doubled over the past few years.  The fire season is starting earlier and lasts longer.

There is an intense debate about climate change in the US.  Our president has placed many agencies in the hands of climate change deniers with ties to oil and coal.  Their claim is that the science is flawed and that there really is not a scientific consensus about climate change or even its causes.

The goal of the Paris accords, from  which Donald Trump has removed the United States, was to curb emissions world wide to prevent an increase of global temperatures of over 2 degrees Centigrade.   The scientific community argues that if emissions are not cut, our world could see a  temperature increase of 5 degrees Centigrade or more by 2100.

So, who to believe?  It may help to look at the evidence  and how it was obtained.  If it is so very important for the future of our planet, then it is worth taking time to consider it.  In the next post there will be some references to help with that.

 

SHINY GERANIUM A TREAT

These calves eagerly ate several bags of shiny geranium pulled by hand

Shiny geranium was first discovered in Ridgefield last year. It was found on Pioneer Street, in the Post office parking lot, and on six acres in Allen Canyon. A great deal of work and expense was spent to deal with it. Much of the effort was to get it before it went to seed. I did most of the work in Ridgefield and helped Les Greear treat it on his property. The seeds sprout after the first late summer/fall rains. After the first rains in mid September, we were disappointed to see so many new seedlings pop up.  We have begun treating them again.  This weed is spreading rapidly in  north Clark County and will probably become a  pest for Gee Creek and the Refuge in spite of our efforts.