Building The Arched Culvert on N Main Avenue

The rebuilding of North Main Avenue brought many improvements to the city’s northern arterial street.  Adding two new culverts and raising the street to over 10 feet higher will  put the road and  at least one driveway  above the floods for both Gee Creek and the Columbia River.  There is a wide sidewalk that will get pedestrians and joggers out of the street.  New guard rails on both sides  should prevent vehicles from going off the road.  Of all the events, putting the arched culvert together was the most interesting

The arched culvert pieces were assembled on August 22nd of last year.  There were 24 pieces that made for 12 arches.  Since the arches had to support each other, the two halves had to be placed in the footings simultaneously.  To do that, two giant mobile  cranes were used.  Each half culvert section weighed 77 tons.  The work had to be carefully coordinated to protect the machinery, the concrete arches, and the workers.  It was fun to watch.  It was Legos, Tinker Toys, and Tonka Toys for big boys and girls.  Below are some of the photos I took on that day.

The heavy pieces of culvert had to be picked off the truck bed, attached to cable rigging, and swung into place. There was a queue of trucks entering and leaving from opposite sides all day long.  It meant 24 trucks each carrying one half section of culvert.

To move the sections into position, each piece had  several points of connection using cables, chains, and pulleys.  At the top of each section, facing the camera, are holes into which rebar will be placed.

Even though the pieces were quite large, they needed to be placed in exactly the right place in the footings.  It meant careful coordination with the two crane operators with the men in the lift helping to guide the process.  Since the two pieces would come to rest on each other, they had to be placed at the same time.

As the day progressed, the final pieces of the culvert were placed.  Note the array of chains, pulleys, and cables.   Looking at the back of the crane, there can be seen a stack of very heavy weights which counterbalanced the cranes.  It was easy  to see how skillfully the assembly was done.

The sections of the culvert were all put in place on August 22, but there still  was much work to be done.

Paul Snoey

About Paul Snoey

I have a degree in Biology and Environmental Science from WSU Vancouver
I am very fond of Gee Creek and Allen Canyon Creek and do a lot of volunteer work to restore these creeks.

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