I mailed my ballot!

DID YOU?

 

Meet My New Advertiser!

Victory Rehabilitation and Healthcare Center in Battle Ground has recently started advertising on FYI. I asked them to send information about their services, and this is what they provided.

“Victory Rehabilitation and Healthcare Center is owned and operated by Orianna Health Systems.

“Orianna’s Vision: We aspire to improve the health and well-being of our patients through innovative care and the pursuit of excellence.

“Orianna’s Mission: Orianna Health Systems patient-focused care model aims to empower our employees to surpass our patients’ needs and expectations with empathy and compassion, dignity and integrity.

“Victory provides both short term rehabilitation and long term nursing care for adults,  seniors and the disabled.  Our services include 24 hour nursing  care, Physical, occupational  and speech therapies among many other services aimed to improve  the overall health and well-being of those we serve.   We are the only such facility in the Battle Ground area. “

I welcome Victory to our blog. You can learn more about their services by clicking on the ad at the right. Victory Rehabilitation may be reached at 360-687-5141.

Meet My New Advertiser!

Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic School is now advertising on FYI. Here’s come information about the school.

“Preparing your child to be their best, Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic School provides students from preschool through 8th grade with a comprehensive Catholic education, rooted in faith, family, and service. Our strong Catholic/Christian values and traditions combined with rigorous academics, community service, and extracurricular opportunities provide a well-rounded education. Lourdes graduates have a strong academic, social, and moral foundation that serve them well throughout life.

“We welcome all faiths at our family oriented school, teach Spanish from preschool onwards, have an extensive music program, and are conveniently located near the I-5 and 39th Street interchange in Vancouver, WA, just minutes from the I-5 Bridge. Schedule your personal school tour today, visit our safe and nurturing environment and meet our talented teachers.”

I welcome Our Lady of Lourdes to the blog. Please click on their ad to learn more about the school.

Snow Courtesy

We don’t get much snow here, so maybe some people don’t know that when a merchant shovels a space in front of his store you should not park in that space. Leave it open so people can get to the sidewalk without stepping on the pile of snow that’s piled up along the rest of the frontage.

If you have a disabled passenger, let that person out in the cleared area and then move forward to open up the space for others.

Be thoughtful and above all, if you have to drive, go slowly.

The Weather Man Was Right

This was the view from my back door when I woke up this morning – up to a foot of snow in places. Stay warm and dry and enjoy your day off!

 

New Hunting and Fishing Licenses

The state’s new recreational license sales system became operational last week, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) officials say the switch from the old system went as smoothly as possible.”This secure, next-generation system will improve service to our customers and to the approximately 600 retailers across the state who partner with us,” says Peter Vernie, WDFW’s licensing division manager.

Customers will notice one significant change when they buy licenses or manage their accounts. The new system has a single log-in that provides customers access to their data and allows them to buy licenses and report harvest activity. The new system also underwent extensive security reviews by the state’s cyber-security and technology agencies before it was approved for launch.

People who have questions or difficulty using the system should call the Licensing Division’s customer service desk at 360-902-2464 or email licensing@dfw.wa.gov.

WDFW sells about 2.5 million hunting and fishing licenses and related recreational permits each year, generating about $55 million in revenue that directly supports recreation programs and hunting and fishing opportunities. The system also sells the Discover Pass throughout the state. Individuals can access WDFW’s licensing system at:  https://fishhunt.dfw.wa.gov/.

Merry Christmas!

Meet my new Advertiser: Victory Rehabilitation and Healthcare Center of Battle Ground

Victory is owned and operated by Orianna Health Systems.

Orianna aspires to improve the health and well-being of their patients through innovative care and the pursuit of excellence.

Orianna Health Systems patient-focused care model aims to empower their employees to surpass their patients’ needs and expectations with empathy and compassion, dignity and integrity.

victory-interiior

Victory provides both short term rehabilitation and long term nursing care for adults, seniors and the disabled.  Our services include 24 hour nursing care, physical, occupational and speech therapies among many other services aimed to improve  the overall health and well-being of those we serve.   We are the only such facility in the Battle Ground area.

Victory Rehabilitation and Healthcare Center is at 510 N Parkway in Battle Ground. Phone number is  360-687-5141

Color on Main Avenue

Photo by Paul Snoey

                                              Photo by Paul Snoey

Here it is the 6th of December and we still have leaves on the streets downtown. Who can argue that our weather is not warming?

Walk and Knock this Saturday

walk-and-knock

‘Walk-and-Knock’ is this Saturday with pick-up between 9:00am and noon.  Ridgefield residents who wish to donate canned non perishable food to the Vancouver Food Bank or the Ridgefield Neighbors Helping Neighbors may do so by putting plastic shopping bags with items on their door steps or at the curb if dry.  The donated food will be picked up by local volunteers and sent to the two food banks that help low income families.

Also if people would wish to volunteer in the pick-up, they can do so by showing up at the Ridgefield High School meeting point between 8:15 and 8:30am.  Drivers with vehicles and walkers are needed.  Routes will be assigned along with student volunteers as walkers.  When the routes are completed, return to the high school and unload.  You will be finished by noon and have time to participate in our Home Town Celebration.   Bring your kids, pick-up kids, it doesn’t matter.  It’s all for a good cause and a great learning experience for everyone. 

Taylor Tour

David and Donna Taylor are on a trip to the mid east, and David promised to send articles about their travels. Please note that some of these articles may be out of sync because David sends them when there is access to wifi, so sometimes I get two on the same day.

The day started early.  Saturday is the Jewish Sabbath or Shabat.  Things change on Shabat.  Elevators stop on every floor regardless.  Buttons don’t work.  First thing we were at the Garden of Gethsemane early.  Walked through the Garden and around the Sacred plot of Olive Trees.  Visited the Church at the Garden with its murals, then back through the garden for some self introspection.

Ascended to the top of the Mount of Olives and viewed the Walled City of Jerusalem across the valley.  Traffic , especially bus and tourist traffic is like no other place in the world.  Narrow streets with the busses passing within six inches of each other one big traffic jam.

From the top of the Mount we proceeded to the Brigham Young University center for Near East Studies for Sabbath Services.  With most restaurants closed we traveled across the city to Ramot Rachel.  It was the site of a fierce battle during the Six Day War.  After lunch we had an appointed time to meet for the Garden Tomb.  The Tomb site is under the control of a British foundation.  It is open to Christians on the Sabat but not Jews.  While we were at the tomb site for our two hour visit, there must have been twelve other groups in the compound.

Our Tomb site guide, an Englishman with impeccable British English, took us to Golgotha where there is the image in the lime stone of a skull, the eyes, the nose, and the mouth naturally occurring in the vertical face.  There he gave a detailed description of the Roman trial process with two witnesses, The Roman crucifixion and the burial in the crypts.

We entered the line to the tomb where Christ was placed after his body was taken down. We entered the crypt through a small door.  At the time of Christ it was probably only a hole about three feet in diameter.  We entered a room with a larger space for preparation of the body.  The far space to the left was where Jesus’ body was laid.

This was a new crypt unused at the time but meant for members of Joseph’s family.  This Joseph was not the Joseph of Joseph and Mary.  While there we spent time on the grounds to reflect on the many thing in His life and the many things that occurred after His rising.  This was a truly spiritual Sabbath Day.

Tomorrow is a free day and that concludes our visit to Israel.  We have plans with other couples in our group to visit the National Museum and view the Dead Sea Scrolls.

Dave Taylor

Taylor Tour – Bethlehem

David and Donna Taylor are on a trip to the mid east, and David promised to send articles about their travels. Please note that some of these articles may be out of sync because David sends them when there is access to wifi, so sometimes I get two on the same day. Note: Photos are courtesy Wikipedia: David has been unable to send pictures.

A 45 minute drive from the hotel in the morning rush took us to Bethlehem.  Had to cross into Palestinian territory as Bethlehem is in their territory.  Our regular guide, Asher, was not with us as he is Israeli and Israeli citizens are not allowed in the Palestinian East Bank. Of interest is that all the cities we visit and see are built on the tops of hills.  At the bottoms are washes and rocks. The bus drops us at the bus center.  The busses cannot enter the area of the Church of the Nativity.  It is a ten block walk up hill to the Church of the Nativity, an Orthodox Church.

Church of the Nativity

Church of the Nativity

The Church is in the process of a major reconstruction, having been built some 300 years ago.  The site has seen successive churches over the past 1,900 years, having been built and years later destroyed in wars.  The first church was constructed some 100 years after Christ.  It was destroyed and the site filled with some thirty feet of rock.  A subsequent church was built on the site two hundred years later.  A Persian invasion which saw all the areas’ churches being destroyed saw this site being left after the Persian leaders found the images of the three Magi in Persian dress in the church.  The rock that was filled by the Romans where the church now stands is some 30 ft. above the manger site.

At one side of the church is a line for entry to the manger room below.  The line is long and slow.  Entering a door adjacent to the alter you descend a circular rock stairway to the lower room in which the birthplace lies.  It was a small cave-like recess in the room.  On the floor of the cave is a star signifying the birth place of the Christ Child.  Many people kneel to kiss or touch the star.  To the left are two stone mangers in which the Christ Child was laid.  The room is about 30 ft. by 20 ft.  Climbing the stairway brings us out on the other side of the altar of the church.

Star marking where Jesus was born , according to Christian tradition

Star marking where Jesus was born , according to Christian tradition

Back to the bus and a short trip to a olive wood shop.  I now have Bethlehem olive wood for pens. On to another terraced area where we stopped and looked over the terraced landscape on the opposite side of the wash. It looked much as it did some 2,000 years ago as the angel appeared to the shepherds guarding their flocks, bringing them glad tidings and joy.

Return to our hotel in Jerusalem.  Walked to the Damascus Gate.  Today is the beginning of the Sabah, the Jewish sabbath.   It begins at sunset about 4:30pm and so all of the elevators the elevator panels are locked down so that the elevator stops at each floor going up or down.  We are on the eighth floor of an eight floor hotel.  Down one floor, the doors open and people get on or off and then down to the next floor even if nobody requests that floor.  Takes a while to get up or down.

Damascus Gate

Damascus Gate

For the evening and tomorrow the city only operates necessary things.

Dave Taylor

Taylor Tour – Bethlehem

David and Donna Taylor are on a trip to the mid east, and David promised to send articles about their travels. Please note that some of these articles may be out of sync because David sends them when there is access to wifi, so sometimes I get two on the same day. Note: Photos are courtesy Wikipedia, David has been unable to send pictures.

Temple Mount

Temple Mount

Early morning departure from the hotel.  A short bus ride through some incredibly narrow streets lined with cars. The drivable area seemed about 2 feet wider than the bus to the Dung Gate on the south side of the Temple Mount on Mt. Moriah.  Enter the gate and to the walkway that leads to the Temple Mount.  Through a control gate monitored by Muslim security.  The Temple Mount is in control of the Muslims.  On the Temple Mount is the Dome of the Rock which is over the Stone of Abraham.  The dome is not a Mosque but a Shrine.

Another building on the Mount is the Mosque.  Our Guide said that we were fortunate to not have many people on the Mount at the time of our visit.  The mount is open to non-Muslims for two hours a day only.  Also the Dome of the Rock is not open to non-Muslims at all.  Exiting down a narrow passage way to a narrow alley and follow it out to the area of the West Wall which was at one time named the ‘Wailing Wall’.  The wall is divided into two sections: one for men and the other for women.  We saw Jewish people praying and leaving paper prayers at the wall.  We also saw a group organizing for a Bar Mitzvah of young boys at the wall.

Dome of the Rock

Dome of the Rock

From the wall we returned to the alley street we came in on and proceeded to the entry to a tunnel on the outside of the wall built to carry water to the temple site.  The tunnel was only discovered in recent years.  It follows north along the West Wall and has a cistern at its end for water supply to the Temple Mount.

Exiting the tunnel we walked a short distance to the ‘Via dela Rosa’, the walk that Christ carried the cross to Calvary Hill.  There are several ‘Stations of the Cross’ on this narrow street.  Noted all streets in this area are narrow.  We proceeded along the wandering alleys in the Muslim Quarter within the original Jerusalem city walls.  We visited the Bethesda Pools where several miracles happened.  This area is under control of a French Order. Here we discover the ancient city beneath the modern streets.

Lions; Gate

Lions; Gate

A short walk to the Lions Gate to a site believed to have been the room of The Last Supper.  This room was devoid of statues or ornate elements but quietly simple and elegant.  We then walked to St. Georges Orthodox Church which was built over the ruins of the site where Jesus was held under arrest by the Roman soldiers the night preceding his trial before Pontius Pilate.  We went down the steps and gathered in that room.  Following in His footsteps in his last days was humbling.

Dave Taylor

Taylor Tour – Masada and Qumran

David and Donna Taylor are on a trip to the mid east, and David promised to send articles about their travels. Please note that some of these articles may be out of sync because David sends them when there is access to wifi, so sometimes I get two on the same day. Note: Photos are courtesy Wikipedia, David has been unable to send pictures.

A really fantastic day.  Left the kibbutz for the last time and headed south.  Lots of farm land.  Most of the crops are grown in tent houses.  Banana fields under tents with flat tops.  Tents are four to five hundred feet square, lots and lots of them. Water along the Jordan is what keeps the agriculture going.  The Israelis have perfected the tent farming.  Besides bananas, there are tomato, cucumber, and other types of vegetables  The Jordan works its way south meandering down to the Dead Sea some 60 miles south.  We drive by the town of Jericho and down the road several miles we pass through a check point.  We are now in the Palestinian territory of the West Bank.  We had to have our passports ready but they waved us on.  There is a double fence along the Jordanian Border which does not necessarily follow the River Jordan.  The fence is electrified.  Another check point twenty miles further south with Israeli soldiers on guard there.

Qumran CAve 4, where 90% of the scrolls were found

Qumran CAve 4, where 90% of the scrolls were found

About three hours into the trip we pass through the area of Qumran and we make a brief stop along the roadside.  Our guide points out the cave in which the Qumran scrolls were discovered in 1947 by a shepherd boy.  He was throwing rocks from the lip of the cave and heard pottery being broken.  Climbing down he found the scrolls in the broken pottery.  He brought the elders to the site and the rest is history.  About a half hour down the toad we turn into a national historic site, Masada.  We entered the visitor’s center and took the tram to the top.  There is a path up for those willing to make the climb.  It takes about an hour and a half for a healthy person.

Aerial View of Masada

Aerial View of Masada

Most have heard the story of Masada, built by Herod the Great as a refuge on a high plateau with steep sides and with virtually no access.  The access was controlled by a defendable entry along a narrow steep path.  On top he built a three level palace on the north side away from the sun.  This palace had living areas on the top level and on the second level was Herod’s pool.  Below that on the third level he had a bath house constructed, complete with a medium temperature room, a cold room and pool, and a sauna room.  The fortress had a water system and a cistern that could hold forty years of water supply.  The water had to be carried up to the fortress from ducts built to collect rain water from the hills and deposit it on a hillside collector high above the land.  After Herod’s death in four BC  the fortress was idle.

The great Jewish revolt from Roman authority happened in 66 AD.  Some 950 Jews: men, women and children, fled to the fortress.  Some 10,000 Roman soldiers surrounded the plateau fortress for four years.  The Romans built a ramp and used a battering ram and fire to breach the fortress gates.  The Jews, seeing defeat and being sent into slavery for them and their children, chose to self destruct.  The men killed their families and then committed suicide rather than face slavery.  The Romans found no living people.  The story of what happened inside the fort at the final siege was told later by two women survivors.  A fascinating story.  The ruins have been somewhat preserved and wooden walk ways of teak preserve the area.  An impressive site and a national treasure.  This site is the most non-religious visitor site in Israel.

Leaving Masada we head north towards Jerusalem, but along the way we make a stop at an area on the Dead Sea and take the opportunity to float in the Dead Sea.  The Dead Sea is 30 percent salt.  You can’t swim in the water, you float.  While we were there a woman had to be rescued because she was face down in the water and could not roll over.  It’s a place where you need to exercise extreme caution.  We took rinse at water’s edge and then a long shower to get the salt off.  Back on the bus and drive to Jerusalem for the first time.  Crossing the Judean hills to the east we saw a totally barren hilly landscape.  Across the pass and the first view of Jerusalem is the Dome of the Rock in the distance.  An impressive view also.  A very crowded city with extremely narrow streets in a very large bus and on to the hotel.

Dave Taylor

Taylor Tour – Sea of Galilee

David and Donna Taylor are on a trip to the mid east, and David promised to send articles about their travels. Please note that some of these articles may be out of sync because David sends them when there is access to wifi, so sometimes I get two on the same day.

mona-lisa-of-galilee

‘Mona Lisa of Galilee’

Departed our kibbutz at the south of the Sea of Galilee for Sepphoris, the birth place of Mary. Sepphoris is a ancient Roman city with ruins along with a crusade age citadel and chapel.  The Roman ruins cover several acres on the top of the hill.  The site is still in excavation but there are several sites where the mosaic floors are of significance.  One is the ‘Mona Lisa of Galilee’, another appears to have an African influence with lions, elephants and other African animals in the mosaic.  Beautiful work, difficult to restore and preserve.  They have covers over these artifacts and raised walkways for viewing.

The streets are the original Roman built stone and still show the chariot or cart tracks.  We then proceeded north up to the Ramat Golan area and to Caesarea Phillipi (Banias), an ancient pagan city dedicated to the Greek god Pan and reconstructed by Phillip the son of Herod.  It was here that Peter made his proclamation of faith in Jesus, who declared him the rock on which he would build his church.  This is also one of the seven springs that feed the Jordan River.

mt-hermon

Mt. Hermon

This spring is at the base of Mt. Hermon, the top of which the Transfiguration is said to have occurred. The main spring has moved downstream from its original cave.  Four of the seven original springs have also dried up.  Leaving the area of the springs we proceeded up the Golan Heights to the overlook of the valley to the north.  This is the site where the modern day Six Day War between Israel and Syria commenced on the North with Egypt on the south simultaneously.   The UN still monitors the border between Syria and Israel from this site.   Long drive back to the kibbutz.

We are learning many new things about ancient and biblical Israel as well as current day Israel.

Dave Taylor