Welcome to our New Author

Paul Snoey has been contributing articles to FYI for a long time now, and I’ve now given him direct access to the blog, so he’s now able to post directly without my editing the article.

This will ensure that the pictures he takes go along with the writing portion, as I sometimes goofed up and had an incorrect caption.

His posts will be filed under ‘Paul Snoey Articles’ so they’ll be easy to access if you want to look at them again. If you would like to comment on Paul’s posts, it’s easy to do so, just click on ‘leave a comment.’

 

SHINY GERANIUM A TREAT

These calves eagerly ate several bags of shiny geranium pulled by hand

Shiny geranium was first discovered in Ridgefield last year. It was found on Pioneer Street, in the Post office parking lot, and on six acres in Allen Canyon. A great deal of work and expense was spent to deal with it. Much of the effort was to get it before it went to seed. I did most of the work in Ridgefield and helped Les Greear treat it on his property. The seeds sprout after the first late summer/fall rains. After the first rains in mid September, we were disappointed to see so many new seedlings pop up.  We have begun treating them again.  This weed is spreading rapidly in  north Clark County and will probably become a  pest for Gee Creek and the Refuge in spite of our efforts.

 

Stream Life

Paul Snoey took the photos above and below in Abrams Park just below the Division Street Bridges. The two photos are of the same spot before and after the sediment was brushed away.

Aquatic insects, mollusks, small fish, and crustaceans need areas free of sediment.

Response to Paul Snoey Article on Storm Water Run Off

I thought this comment was worth publishing because I know not every one reads the comments under posts, and it is worth reading.

Sadly, the silt is not surprising given the poor storm water runoff control by developers and lack of enforcement by our city. As an example, drive along Royle Rd. and look at all the dirt in the ferns along the drainage ditch on the outside of their storm water runoff fencing on the southeast side of road near the HS…this is right above Gee Creek, and just waiting for a rainfall event to wash all that dirt into the creek!!!  This is exactly why we need storm water runoff permits and regulations at construction sites! I hope these folks get fined for their disregard to our environment and storm water drainage systems. Their mitigation tactics are sub-par and they have the means to do better!

Snoey Report on Fish

With the heavy rain this morning flows were restored on Allen Canyon Creek. The nice thing about it is how clean the stream is.  The stranded fish are now free but have chosen to stay in the area and when I dropped some food in the creek they eagerly ate it. If a way could be found to sustain some flow during the summer drought, this stream could maintain a population of salmon.
When I returned to town this afternoon I checked Gee Creek in Abrams Park and found a creek heavily laden with sediment.  This is not good.

Both photos were taken this afternoon on Allen Canyon Creek and Gee Creek.

 

Fish in Allen Canyon Creek

Paul Snoey took this picture yesterday morning at Allen Canyon Creek.  The remaining pools are lowering quickly but if it rains later this week they will be saved.  These fish are about 3 to 4 inches now and are much too crowded in the shrinking pools.  In an upper pool, which has an unknown fish, he noticed a lot of splashing at the surface and then a head popped up and then disappeared again and then more splashing.

The head popped up again and he saw that it was a garter snake.  It was trying to catch fish.  Fish trapped in pools are vulnerable because they have little room to escape.  In addition to snakes, kingfishers, herons, and even raccoons would make a meal of these fish.

News from Paul Snoey on the Eagle Creek Fire

The fire that started Saturday September 2nd  on Eagle Creek spread west with the east winds on Monday.  On Tuesday afternoon in the Gorge, the air was so full of ash and smoke that cars were driving with their headlights on.  The only view of the sun was on the crest of Cape Horn where the above photo was taken.

This is a photo of Eagle Creek before the fire.

(The photos below were taken Sunday, September 10th.)

Angels Rest is one of the first trails in the Gorge and the trailhead is near the Bridal Veil exit.  The fire spread along the south face of the gorge and burned the summit of Angels Rest.  Devils Rest is the peak in the background and there were many plumes of smoke coming from there as well.   But it is also apparent that there are many areas that did not burn. (Photos taken from Cape Horn trail)

A telephoto view just below the summit of Angel’s Rest shows switchbacks through an area that is burned.  Many trails have sections that are damaged.

Nesmith Point at almost 4,000 feet is part of a boxed canyon that contains several basalt domes. They are named Katanai Rock, Saint Peter’s Dome, Yeon Mountain, and Rock of Ages. All these peaks are burned. (Photos taken from Beacon Rock.)

A telephoto view of St Peter’s Dome shows a burned top.

This fire has been very destructive and disruptive, is not out yet, people are living in shelters, and a major freeway in the area is closed.   The best news is that in a few days we may be having the first significant rainfall in several months.

News from Paul Snoey

Last winter’s storminess and this year’s summer drought have taken a toll on the Coho in both Gee Creek and Allen Canyon Creek.  It has likely taken a toll on the native sea-run cutthroat trout as well.  A series of intense storms may have removed most of the fish released from not only this year’s incubators but last year’s as well.  Abrams Park had many fish all summer long last year, but few  this year. The fish that remain on Gee Creek are in pools below Bertsinger Road just before the Pioneer Street Bridge. Allen Canyon Creek has had no flow for several weeks and the fish are trapped in two small pools. Sprinkling some fish food on the surface lets me know how many are still there and how healthy they are.

Yesterday I sprinkled some food in the pool and a few seconds later, the surface was alive with lots of fish.

When I walked back to my truck a large owl suddenly dropped down and landed  on a branch  over the pool.  It is likely that this Great Grey owl had noticed the commotion on the water and wanted to check it out.  It had an intense look with eyes like black marbles.

Images from a Past Eclipse

Paul Snoey found this image online while looking for instructions on how to photograph an eclipse. He feels anywhere in Ridgefield with trees will see something like this.

Milkweed Plants Survived

The photo is of a blossoming narrow leafed milkweed plant that’s by the entrance to the Pickled Heron building on Pioneer Street.  From a few plants given last year to the owner, Kay Stringfellow, they’ve divided into a nice sized cluster. Honey bees love these flowers.

There were over 200 plants and seed packets given away in Ridgefield last year and those with plants should find them at the peak of blooming.

These plants were given in the hopes of attracting monarch butterflies, but few if any have been seen so far.  The plants are also attractive to other species. The populations of these iconic butterflies are in decline and there is a petition to the U.S Fish and Wildlife Service to list them as threatened under the Endangered Species Act.

USFWS has agreed to make a ruling on this in June of 2019.  In the meantime, it makes sense to grow milkweed plants since the decline in milkweed plants has led to a decline in the Monarch butterfly population.  For those interested, there is a beautiful film about Monarch butterflies.  It is titled Flight of the Butterflies, and can be seen on Netflix.

More info on why Butterflies Puddle

Photo taken at the edge of Gee Creek last week

When butterflies mate the male gives a lot of sodium to the female.  The extra sodium helps with the development of the eggs. Nectar from flowers contains sugar but little sodium. To get the lost sodium back the males will look for wet areas that have concentrations of salt. Although these butterflies are puddling together, they are actually competing. The one that can mate with the most females will pass on more of his genes. The more quickly a male can restore the missing salt, the more quickly he can seek another female. Guys getting together for drinks but looking for females is not unheard of.   – Paul Snoey

Swallowtail Butterflies on Gee Creek

Male Western Tiger Swallow-tail butterflies will sometimes congregate in wet areas seeking nutrients.  The term for this behavior is mud-puddling.  These butterflies were seen today on the west side of Gee Creek downstream from Abrams Park.  There were 32 that I counted with some leaving and new arrivals dropping in on occasion.

Goats at Storm Water Facility

There are about 50 animals in a Bellwood Heights storm water facility on Heron Ridge Drive.  They’ve been eating the plentiful grass from a wet spring.  It’s mostly sheep with a pair of llamas and a few goats as well.  It seems to be a popular place: cars stop, children get out, and they enjoy watching the animals.  Grass is poor nutrition and grass eating animals must eat a lot of it to get the nourishment they need.  This means a lot of manure and urine produced.    This facility has already has had a great deal of manure put in it. You can see it on the ground and even smell it if the wind is right.  This may not be a good thing.  A storm water facility is a place for treating storm water.  The purpose is to remove nutrients and sediments and release it to a water body as clean water.  Having goats and sheep to control vegetation is great in many situations.

Vineyards and organic farms see this as an alternative to herbicides for controlling unwanted weeds and grass.  During times of rainfall surface water from several blocks flows through this facility.  As a consequence of too many animals, nutrients and coliform bacteria could be carried into Gee Creek.   There is rain predicted for Thursday, June 15th.   If there is enough rain to move storm water through this facility, it would be a good day to find out if there is a problem.

Thanks for Paul Snoey for this information.

New Trees Thrive

Tevis Laspa provided 80 cedars and 50 Douglas firs for Gee Creek.  They have been planted in Abrams Park along the creek by the soccer field and below Division Street. Many are also planted in the field by the Heron Ridge Bridge.  The cages and rodent collars were provided by Paul Snoey, who also planted them using potting soil rather than the native compacted clay.  Without cages, most trees would be taken by beavers.

The trees are doing very well this spring.  Our cool wet weather has helped them get a good start.   It is important to keep them from being overwhelmed by brush and to water them the first year if necessary.

Trees benefit the creek by helping to stabilize the stream bank and help the stream stay cool by providing shade.  Shade also helps with controlling many nonnative plants such as reed canary grass and blackberries.

It is estimated that a one hundred year old Douglas fir will have removed 7 tons of carbon dioxide over its lifetime, so the new trees will help our city reduce its carbon footprint.  Part of the restoration of Gee Creek has been to remove plants such as blackberries and knotweed and replace them with native plants.

 

Milkweed Plants Emerging

Last year Paul Snoey gave away more than 200 plants and seed packets of narrow leafed milkweed collected from the Gorge.  Several of the plants were given to Kay Stringfellow, who planted hers near the entrance to the Pickled Heron Gallery.  Paul has been watching for them to emerge and have wondered if they survived the winter.   In the last few days of warmth and sunshine, they have begun to put up shoots. Others that have planted milkweed  should see theirs emerge soon as well.

Monarch butterflies time their arrival with the emergence of milkweed plants and generally lay their eggs on young plants.  It would be unlikely that monarchs will come this year but as the population of milkweeds grows in the next few years, Ridgefield may get some.

In the meantime, the plants should bloom this year and are an excellent resource for bees and butterflies. They are drought and deer resistant so should do well here in the summertime.  The population of monarchs is still very low but there are many efforts from private people and public agencies to restore them.  Planting milkweeds and pollinator friendly plants free from herbicides and insecticides is something we all can do.