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Climate Change Revisited

 

The graph above is the latest Monthly graph (May) for 2019.  The peaks for each year are always  in May. As growth begins in the northern hemisphere, it begins to take CO2 out of the atmosphere thus  the dip seen each year.  The increase each year from month to month is due to the burning of fossil fuels.  The difference between May 2019 and May 2018 is 3.6 PPM.  All the months so far in 2019, are above 3.0 PPM, a large increase.  The three biggest carbon emitters in the world are the US, China, and India.  The US increased it’s CO2 emissions in 2018 by 2.5%,  China by 4.7 %, and India by 6.3%.   The world as a whole increased it’s CO2 emissions by 2.7% compared to 2017.  So, the world is increasing emissions of CO2 instead of reducing emissions, reversing a trend the last few years.  The reason is economic growth of all three countries.  China is relying on coal for producing electricity, as is India, even though both are making strides in alternative energy sources.

 

The graph above is of the increase each year of CO2  from 1960 through 2018.  The black bars represent the average for the decade.  It is notable that the first decade averaged less than 1.0 ppm, while the decade beginning in 2000 averaged almost 2.0ppm. As mentioned above, so far in 2019, the monthly averages are over 3 ppm higher than last year.  If that trend continues, then 2019 could be the highest yearly average ever.  2019 will be the last year of the decade.  If the average is 3 ppm, then the decade will average about 2.5 ppm.  So, it’s clear that we are increasing emissions of CO2 rather than decreasing.

GLOBAL AVERAGE TEMPERATURE BY YEAR:  1850 TO 2018

The colorful stripes above represent the temperature of the earth over the past 168years.  Each stripe is one year and the colors from blue to red represent cooler to warmer.   This graph was obtained from a “Show your Stripes” website.  It shows in an elegant manner the rise in temperature of our planet in the last few decades.  The last few decades have been notable for record heat, cold, rain,  drought, hurricanes, and typhoons.  The signature of  a warming world due to an ever increasing amount of CO2 into the atmosphere is strong.

I recently read about the winter that Lewis and Clark and company spent at Fort Clatsop.   They were miserable.  They were tired of eating mostly elk meat.  They must have been dirty and stinky.  They were wet because it rained all the time.  They were happy to break camp in the spring and head up the Columbia River and home.  It was the beginning of the modern age that began with the industrial revolution in England.  The age we’re in now is largely fueled by fossil fuels.  I could think about our explorers in the modern age.  After a day in the field they could come back to, let’s say, a hotel, take a hot shower,  and put on clean clothes.  Then, while drinking a cold beer, Meriwether Lewis could write up a report and e-mail it to Thomas Jefferson.    Then, they could fly back home.  The point is that the modern world is wonderful.  However, we are not paying the social and environmental cost associated with it.  The climate scientists are telling us that we must stop putting CO2 into the atmosphere.  To do that we must stop burning fossil fuels.  Some climate scientists are saying that not only must we stop emitting CO2, but we must begin removing it.   That would be tough.  It will be tough enough just to slow emissions.  CO2 has a long residence time in the atmosphere and the level of CO2 in the atmosphere now will have consequences that last hundreds if not a thousand years.  It is unlikely that we can change our minds in the future and undo the ongoing changes.  The best we can do is to slow the changes down.   However, there is great resistance to doing that and I’m doubtful that we will but there is always hope.  Many people are working  hard to make a difference.

contributed by Paul Snoey

About Paul Snoey

I have a degree in Biology and Environmental Science from WSU Vancouver
I am very fond of Gee Creek and Allen Canyon Creek and do a lot of volunteer work to restore these creeks.

Comments

  1. We need a WWII style mobilization of our economy at all levels of Government with the goal of net zero carbon by 2030.
    The increase in commuting that Ridgefield sprawl has induced is a climate disaster.
    No one in local government recognizes they have a role to play in arresting climate change.
    Without organized advocates, nothing happens.

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