From Knotweed to Trees

 

One of the goals of stream restoration of Gee Creek is to rid the creek of weed species such as Japanese knotweed and blackberries and replace them with native species of trees and other plants.  This photo was taken in June of 2009.  It was  a dense tangle of Japanese knotweed, blackberries, and nettles.  The tops are about 13 feet above ground and many were bound together by morning glory vines. Getting rid of the knotweed and other weeds in the watershed was difficult.

The photo above is the same view after the knotweed ,blackberries, and nettles were removed.  The first trees planted here were willows and a few cottonwoods.  Later, Tevis planted cedars.  However, the fence along the creek was not a good one and eventually beavers took most of the cedars and many of the willows.  It was distressing to see the hard work lost.

The last photo was taken earlier this week.  Last fall, a good fence was built from here to the heron ridge bridge.  It has been successful, at least so far, in keeping out beavers.  There’s lots of new trees put in this spring  from here into the city’s storm water facility.  In time, the hope is to see a dense stand of trees all along Gee Creek from the east end of Abrams Park to the refuge.  There is a great deal more work to do that and many problems to overcome.  The photos are from Tevis Laspa’s property.

Contributed by Paul Snoey

 

 

 

About Paul Snoey

I have a degree in Biology and Environmental Science from WSU Vancouver
I am very fond of Gee Creek and Allen Canyon Creek and do a lot of volunteer work to restore these creeks.

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