New Trees Thrive

Tevis Laspa provided 80 cedars and 50 Douglas firs for Gee Creek.  They have been planted in Abrams Park along the creek by the soccer field and below Division Street. Many are also planted in the field by the Heron Ridge Bridge.  The cages and rodent collars were provided by Paul Snoey, who also planted them using potting soil rather than the native compacted clay.  Without cages, most trees would be taken by beavers.

The trees are doing very well this spring.  Our cool wet weather has helped them get a good start.   It is important to keep them from being overwhelmed by brush and to water them the first year if necessary.

Trees benefit the creek by helping to stabilize the stream bank and help the stream stay cool by providing shade.  Shade also helps with controlling many nonnative plants such as reed canary grass and blackberries.

It is estimated that a one hundred year old Douglas fir will have removed 7 tons of carbon dioxide over its lifetime, so the new trees will help our city reduce its carbon footprint.  Part of the restoration of Gee Creek has been to remove plants such as blackberries and knotweed and replace them with native plants.

 

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