Toastmasters

Ridgefield Toastmasters Meeting6:30-7:30PM each Tuesday in the Ridgefield Community United Methodist Church at 1410 S. Hillhurst Road in Ridgefield. Have fun becoming the speaker and leader you want to be. We provide a safe, friendly and supportive environment. The first three weekly meetings are free, with a small membership fee if you wish to continue and become a member of Toastmasters International. You may call Gene at 802 989-0624 for more information.

Thought for the Week

A Killdeer Nest

I went down to the Port Waterfront area to find and photograph some trilliums in the woods near the Port. I did not find them but came across a killdeer along the Railroad tracks on the way back. As soon as I saw the bird I looked down and saw the four eggs in the nest.  I pulled out my camera a took a picture standing over the nest.

The killdeer walked towards me and when only  a few feet away began its wounded bird routine

Instead of the broken wing routine, it spread it’s wings and tail feathers.  It’s a behavior they use to draw predators away from their nest.  When  a predator leaves the nest area and approaches the bird, it suddenly flies away.

When I walked away from the nest and was about 10 feet or so away,  it calmly sat  back on its nest as if nothing was wrong.  Male and female killdeers look alike, take turns incubating the eggs, and the incubation takes about 4 weeks. The chicks are precocious, born with their eyes open, and can feed themselves within a few hours after hatching.  The parents stay with the chicks for about one month until they are fledged and  can take care of themselves.  There are many nests now along the tracks, around the port area, and  the marina too.  Its best to try not to disturb them during the nesting season. If you get near the nest they usually get up and walk quickly away. The eggs are very hard to see as they are well camouflaged.

~contributed by Paul Snoey

First Saturday

Don’t let the weather spoil your enthusiasm for First Saturday – come on downtown and revel in all the events going on – solve a mystery, buy something at the Farmers’ Market, peek in at the library. It’s small town living at its best!

Welcome our new Librarian!

On Friday, April 13, the Friends of Ridgefield Community Library are hosting a Welcome Reception for Jessica, the newest addition to our team of spectacular librarians! The reception will be held from 4 to 5 pm at the library and is open to the public.

In keeping with the Friends’ tradition, there will be yummy light refreshments, lots of great friends and probably more laughs than you’ll find in your typical library. Let’s give Jessica a good old Ridgefield Welcome by having lots of you come down to meet her and make her feel at home!

Meet Your Local Merchant

With so many new people in town, I thought it would be cool to highlight some of our local businesses. This is the first in a series of articles about stores and people in Ridgefield. We hope you’ll check them out yourself.

The Old Liberty Theater and Seasons Coffee Shop

Don and Earleen Griswold moved to Ridgefield 20 years ago because it seemed like a good place to raise their children.  Their passion for good coffee led them to purchase the building that now houses their two businesses: The Old Liberty Theater and Seasons Coffee Shop at 115 North Main Avenue.

World recognized performing artists love to play at the theater because they receive such a warm welcome and the intimate space allows interaction with the audience. Many community events are also held in the Old Liberty, most recently the Meaningful Movies series on the last Wednesday of the month, and the performances during Youth Arts Month.

Saesons Coffee Shop is open seven days a week serving gourmet organic wood-roasted coffee, sodas, pastries, bagels, waffles, ice cream, etc. It’s the true living room of our town – where people go to relax and enjoy talking with others in the community.

If you mention you saw this article on FYI 98642.com, Don and Earleen are offering a free ice cream to kids with the purchase of a coffee drink. Give it a try! Offer good through April.

Meet my new Advertiser!

I’m pleased to announce that Michelle and Joe Potter of Ridgefield Landscape Products are new advertisers on FYI98642.com. In talking to them, Michelle said Joe has always wanted to have a landscaping yard.

The business is now open at 30505 NW 31st Avenue. Hours are 8-4 Monday through Friday and 8-1 Saturday. They have 20 different landscape and gardening products: bark dust, chips, gravel, drain rock, river rock, sand, 3-way mix – if they don’t have it they can get it. They offer pick up or delivery. Buy ten yards of any material and get free delivery.

They also offer field mowing and large brush removal and they accept yard debris. Bulk quantities of products are available – buying 25-35 yards qualifies you for bulk pricing.

They plan to add planters, sheds and boxes.

Check out their Facebook page here, to see more information. Phone number is 360-887-8945.

 

Thought for the Week

Steve Jobs, the CEO of Apple, died a billionaire.

Here are some of his last thoughts and words:

“I reached the pinnacle of success in the business world.  In others’ eyes, my life is the epitome of success.  However, aside from work, I have little joy.  In the end, wealth is only a fact of life that I have become accustomed to.  At this moment, I am on my sick bed, and recalling my life.  I realize that all of the recognition and wealth in which I took so much pride, have become meaningless in the face of my impending death.

You can employ someone to drive a car for you, and to make money for you, but you cannot employ anyone to bear illness for you.  Material things, when lost, can be found, but the one thing, that can never be found when it is lost, is your health and eventually your life itself.

When a person goes into the operating room, he realizes that there is one book that he has yet to finish reading, “The Book of Healthy Life”.

Whatever stage in life we are at currently, in time we all face that day when the curtain comes down.
Treasure love for your family, love for your spouse and love for your friends.  Treat yourself well, and cherish others.
As we grow older, and hopefully wiser, we slowly realize that wearing a $3,000.00 or a $30.00 watch is not important.  The time is the same.  Whether we carry a $300.00 or $30.00 wallet/handbag, the contents are the same.  Whether we drink a bottle of $100 or $10 wine, the hangover is the same.  Whether the house we live in is 300 or 3,000 sq. ft., the loneliness is the same.  Whether you fly first class or economy, if the plane goes down, you go down with it.

You will come to realize that true inner happiness does not come from the material things of this world.
Therefore, treasure your buddies, old friends, brothers and sisters. Chat often, laugh, sing, enjoy them.  That is true happiness.”

Refuge Needs Volunteers

Calling all Volunteers! Types of Volunteer Opportunities:

Habitat Restoration

Volunteers get to see the most beautiful places on the refuge while helping to ensure that native wildlife have food and shelter. Summer work is focused on maintaining winter plantings and controlling invasive plants that threaten to take over habitat.  Crews meet on most Wednesday and Saturday mornings.

Contact Sean Davis at Sean_Davis@fws.gov or 360-887-3883 x 14

Refuge and Trail Greeters

Over 120,000 visitors flock to the refuge annually to enjoy nature through participation in wildlife observation, photography, environmental education, cultural interpretation, hunting, and fishing. Volunteers help to make their experiences meaningful. Share your enthusiasm for nature and make the Refuge a welcoming place for people walking our trails, stopping at the Visitor Contact Station and driving the AutoTour.

Contact Josie Finley at josie_finley@fws.gov or 360-887-4106 x 130

Cathlapotle Plankhouse

The Cathlapotle Plankhouse draws thousands of visitors to the Refuge each year. Help share the legacy of the Indigenous people who have tended to this place since time immemorial as a Plankhouse Docent or Cultural Educator. Field trips take place during the weekdays. Docents staff the house on weekends from April – September.

Contact Juliet McGraw at juliet_mcgraw@fws.gov 360-887-4106 x 123

Education

Help us inspire the next generation. Kids of all ages need hands-on learning and inspiration in the great outdoors as part of a well-rounded education. We need your help to make their visit to the Refuge fun and memorable. Field trips take place during the weekdays starting in April.

Contact Josie Finley at josie_finley@fws.gov or 360-887-4106 x 130

Now you can sign up to volunteer easily on our website! Check it out by clicking here!

Don’t forget to glance at the Refuge calendar, your one-stop shop for fun activities and volunteer opportunities!

Students from Union Ridge Plant trees

Several classes of  sixth grade students  from Union Ridge Elementary School planted trees  and other plants along the new section of the Gee Creek trail today.  Along with the other volunteer session done two weeks ago, there should be almost 1,000 trees and other plants put in by the Lower Columbia Estuary Partnership.  Part of the reason the Partnership is planting these trees is that Gee Creek is  too warm during the summer.  Trees that make  a shady canopy keep streams cooler.  With the other trees  planted along the creek and the flood plain this year, it  should bring the total to over 1,500 new trees and plants on Gee Creek.  To restore Gee Creek by removing weed species and planting native trees and other plants will require many more hours of brush removal and thousands of new trees.  This is a great start though.

Contributed by Paul Snoey

Ridgefield High School Students Win Top Awards in 2018 Regional High School Art Show

Three Ridgefield High School students earned prestigious art awards for their entries in the 2018 Southwest Washington Regional High School Art Show hosted by Educational Service District 112.  On Tuesday evening, March 20, they were recognized along with other student artists at a “Young Artists’ Reception” awards ceremony and gallery walk at ESD 112.

The annual contest, now in its 45th year, provides area art students with an opportunity to showcase their artwork and recognizes them for their artistic talent.  It is open to all high school students in Grades 9-12 in Southwest Washington.  Artwork entries are now on display at ESD 112 through April 2.

This year, two RHS student artists received Regional Art awards for earning high average scores in the art show.  Their entries will advance to the Annual State Superintendent of Public Instruction’s Art Show in Olympia on May 18 to compete against entries from around Washington state.

Congratulations to the following RHS student artists for their winning entries in this year’s Regional High School Art Show!

  • Taelor Adderly, Grade 12, Regional Award for “When the Sun Sets”
  • Liam McAllister, Grade 11, Regional Award for “The Dead Are Not Expressionless”
  • Arina Blagikh, Grade 11, Honorable Mention Award for “Highlights of Life”

Taelor Adderly was also awarded a $1,000 scholarship from Central Washington University and a $3,000 scholarship from the Oregon College of Art and Craft.

“I am proud of these students for not only their artistic talents, but also their hard work and diligence with their pieces,” said Christen Palmer, Ridgefield High School Principal.  “Furthermore, I know behind each of these accomplishments was a tremendous amount of help and support from Ms. Tamara Hoodenpyl, our Visual Arts teacher.  Congratulations to Ms. Hoodenpyl and her students!”

“When the Sun Sets” by Taelor Adderly – Regional Award

 

“The Dead Are Not Expressionless” by Liam McAllister – Regional Award

 

“Highlights of Life” by Arina Blagikh – Honorable Mention Award

Reminder – Meaningful Movies Tomorrow

March 28th, 7 pm at the Old Liberty Theater, Meaningful Movies in Ridgefield and the Ridgefield Community Library present the Oscar-nominated short documentary “Heroin(e)”. The film will be followed by a panel discussion featuring Fire Chief John Nohr, Police Chief John Brooks, Clinical Director of the Ridgefield Recovery Village Dallas Carroll, Ann Donnelly – Mental Health Advocate, Brad Anderson – Chief of Addiction Medicine for Kaiser Permanente and others.

We will discuss the current state of the opioid crisis in our area, available resources and ideas to address this epidemic. The film is free, snacks, ice cream, beer, wine, coffee and tea available for purchase.

Foreign Language Proficiency Earns School Credits for RHS Students

Did you know that RHS students who successfully demonstrate proficiency in a foreign language in district-approved assessment tests can earn credits to meet the graduation requirement for World Language?  The Ridgefield School District Board of Directors approved Board Policy 2409 and procedure 2409P in February, which makes this possible.

Students will be able to earn up to four proficiency-based high school credits depending on the level of proficiency they demonstrate on world language assessments in the areas of listening, reading, writing and speaking.  In addition, students earning high assessment scores that meet a specific threshold will qualify for the Seal of Biliteracy to be placed on his/her high school diploma.

Student response has thus far exceeded district expectations.  In the short time since implementation in February, 18 students have already signed up for assessment testing—an impressive showing for its initial first year of being offered.

The assessments cover many different world languages.  However, the district will make every effort to provide assessments for any language requested.

Students interested in taking this assessment should contact Dani Taylor via email at danielle.taylor@ridgefieldsd.org or call 360-619-1318.  Testing will take place during the week of April 16, and there is a $30 assessment fee.   A lower fee is available for students who qualify for free or reduced lunch.

Thought for the Week

Six Undeniable Facts of Life

1. Don’t educate your children to be rich.  Educate them to be happy, so when they grow up they will know the value of things, and not just their price.
2. “Eat your food as your medicine, otherwise you have to eat medicines as your food.”
3. Find reasons to hang on to the ones you love.
4. There is a big difference between a human being and being human.
5. You are loved when you are born.  You will be loved when you die.  In between, only YOU are in charge of your life.
6. If you just want to walk fast, then walk alone.  However, if you want to walk far, then walk together.”

Voluneers Plant Trees on Gee Creek

Raul Moreno, Tevis Laspa, and I led a volunteer effort to plant trees to enhance Gee Creek last week-end. The  other volunteers were Bob Wallis and Jane Vail of Wallis Engineering, Randy Wray, Dustin and Blake DeMars,  and John Schiessl. We put approximately 180 trees in the ground.  They are  a mixture of Douglas fir, western red cedar, Oregon ash, and red alder.  These are all native trees.  In addition, a few giant sequoias were  added to the Dan Robinson Memorial in the park.  Twenty five of the most vulnerable trees were placed in cages in areas where beavers are most active.  Trees were planted in Abrams Park along the trail just north of the entrance, along the creek just south of the Heron Ridge Bridge,in the Heron Ridge Storm water facility, and on three properties downstream from the facility.  The trees were provided by Raul, Tevis, and  I.  The fencing for the cages was donated by Carol Witek and Tevis provided the posts for the cages.

The effort is to replace weeds and brush with native trees and other vegetation.  The value of trees is to prevent erosion, provide shade, and increased humidity on the creek itself.  Other values would be to make the trail along Gee Creek more pleasing and long lived trees act as sinks to remove carbon dioxide from the air.  If the trees being planted now are cared for they will play an important role in restoring the Gee Creek and  its’ floodplain.  The critical thing is to get them past the first year or two when they are the most vulnerable.

Contributed by Paul Snoey