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Union Ridge Giants

 

If you walk to Union Ridge School on N 8th Avenue, you will be greeted by some giant Douglas Fir trees at the end of the street.  The largest, to the left in the photo, is 145 feet  tall and is 19 feet in circumference at chest height.  It is the largest of some very big trees here and being among them is a pleasure.  Myrna Mills, a former deputy city clerk for the City of Ridgefield, said that when she was a student at Union Ridge, she and other students planted some of these trees.

The Carnegie Institute of Ecology at Stanford University did a study of carbon uptake in forests.  Their conclusion was that 25% of man made carbon dioxide emissions  are taken up by the world’s forests.  It makes sense to preserve and protect forests and trees.   In the United States, Pacific Northwest forests are the best at removing carbon from the atmosphere.  Douglas firs can live over a thousand years and can rival redwoods and giant Sequoias in size.  In addition to their beauty, trees clean the air, provide cooling, and remove carbon dioxide from the air.

Ridgefield has a lot of trees.  When I am in the Carty Unit near Lake River and look  back into town, there are so many trees I can barely make out the houses.  There are many places in Ridgefield  where more trees can be planted so let’s  do that.

Contributed by Paul Snoey

 

About Paul Snoey

I have a degree in Biology and Environmental Science from WSU Vancouver
I am very fond of Gee Creek and Allen Canyon Creek and do a lot of volunteer work to restore these creeks.

Comments

  1. Outstanding! Thank you Paul!

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