7 Ohio Towns People Are Fleeing As Soon As Possible

Ohio is a state with a rich history, diverse culture, and natural beauty. However, not all of its towns are equally attractive to live in. Some of them are facing serious challenges such as high crime rates, low incomes, poor education, and environmental issues.

These factors have led many residents to leave these towns in search of better opportunities elsewhere. Here are seven Ohio towns that people are fleeing as soon as possible.

1. East Cleveland

East Cleveland is a suburb of Cleveland that has been struggling with poverty, violence, and corruption for decades. The town has a median household income of only $20,660, which is less than half of the national average.

The crime rate is also very high, with 2,216 violent crimes and 4,346 property crimes per 100,000 residents in 2019. The town has been under a state of fiscal emergency since 2012, and has faced multiple scandals involving its former mayor and police department.

2. Portsmouth

Portsmouth is a town located on the Ohio River, near the border with Kentucky. The town was once a thriving industrial center, but has suffered from the decline of manufacturing and the opioid epidemic.

The town has a median household income of $29,593, and a poverty rate of 36.5%. The town also has a high rate of drug overdose deaths, with 52.8 per 100,000 residents in 2018. The town has been trying to revitalize its economy and culture, but faces many challenges.

3. Youngstown

Youngstown is a city in northeastern Ohio, known for its steel industry. The city has experienced a long-term population decline, from over 170,000 in 1950 to about 65,000 in 2019. The city has a median household income of $28,393, and a poverty rate of 37.9%.

The city also has a high crime rate, with 1,064 violent crimes and 4,437 property crimes per 100,000 residents in 2019. The city has been trying to diversify its economy and attract new businesses, but faces stiff competition from other cities.

4. Lima

Lima is a city in northwestern Ohio, known for its oil and gas industry. The city has seen a steady population decline, from over 50,000 in 1970 to about 37,000 in 2019. The city has a median household income of $33,930, and a poverty rate of 31.3%.

The city also has a high crime rate, with 1,026 violent crimes and 5,494 property crimes per 100,000 residents in 2019. The city has been trying to improve its education and infrastructure, but faces budget constraints and social issues.

5. Dayton

Dayton is a city in southwestern Ohio, known for its aviation and innovation history. The city has suffered from the loss of jobs and population, from over 260,000 in 1960 to about 140,000 in 2019. The city has a median household income of $31,761, and a poverty rate of 34.5%.

The city also has a high crime rate, with 903 violent crimes and 5,313 property crimes per 100,000 residents in 2019. The city has been trying to reinvent itself as a hub for technology and arts, but faces environmental and health challenges.

6. Chillicothe

Chillicothe is a town in south-central Ohio, known for its historic sites and festivals. The town has been affected by the decline of manufacturing and the opioid crisis. The town has a median household income of $39,381, and a poverty rate of 22.4%.

The town also has a high rate of drug overdose deaths, with 46.3 per 100,000 residents in 2018. The town has been trying to combat the drug problem and promote tourism, but faces limited resources and stigma.

7. Zanesville

Zanesville is a town in east-central Ohio, known for its pottery and art industry. The town has been hit by the closure of factories and the loss of population. The town has a median household income of $35,892, and a poverty rate of 25.8%.

The town also has a high crime rate, with 1,003 violent crimes and 5,830 property crimes per 100,000 residents in 2019. The town has been trying to revitalize its downtown and attract new businesses, but faces aging infrastructure and low demand.

Conclusion

These seven Ohio towns are examples of places that people are leaving in search of better living conditions. They are facing various problems such as economic decline, social unrest, and drug abuse. They are also facing the consequences of climate change, such as floods, storms, and pollution.

These towns need more support and investment from the state and federal governments, as well as from the private sector and the civil society. They also need more innovation and collaboration from their own residents, who have the potential to turn their towns around.

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