7 South Carolina Towns People Are Fleeing As Soon As Possible

South Carolina is a state with a rich history, culture, and natural beauty. However, not all of its towns are equally attractive to residents and visitors. Some towns are facing serious challenges such as high crime rates, low incomes, poor education, and environmental issues. These factors have led many people to leave these towns in search of better opportunities elsewhere. Here are seven South Carolina towns that people are fleeing as soon as possible.

1. Allendale

Allendale is the county seat of Allendale County, which has the lowest population and the highest poverty rate in the state. The town has a median household income of only $16,161, which is less than a third of the national average. The town also has a high violent crime rate of 1,179 per 100,000 people, which is more than four times the national average. The town’s public schools are among the worst in the state, with low test scores and graduation rates. All these factors have contributed to a population decline of 18.5% from 2010 to 2019.

2. Dillon

Dillon is the county seat of Dillon County, which is one of the poorest and most rural counties in the state. The town has a median household income of $23,057, which is less than half of the national average. The town also has a high unemployment rate of 9.1%, which is almost double the national average. The town’s public schools are also struggling, with low test scores and graduation rates. The town has lost 9.4% of its population from 2010 to 2019.

3. Hartsville

Hartsville is the largest city in Darlington County, which is known for its NASCAR racetrack and its nuclear power plant. However, the town has also been plagued by high crime rates, low incomes, and environmental problems. The town has a median household income of $30,719, which is well below the national average. The town also has a high violent crime rate of 1,038 per 100,000 people, which is more than three times the national average. The town’s nuclear power plant has also been the source of controversy, as it has been cited for safety violations and radioactive leaks. The town has lost 8.3% of its population from 2010 to 2019.

4. Marion

Marion is the county seat of Marion County, which is one of the oldest and most historic counties in the state. However, the town has also been facing economic and social challenges, such as high crime rates, low incomes, and poor education. The town has a median household income of $24,462, which is less than half of the national average. The town also has a high violent crime rate of 1,026 per 100,000 people, which is more than three times the national average. The town’s public schools are also among the lowest performing in the state, with low test scores and graduation rates. The town has lost 7.9% of its population from 2010 to 2019.

5. Mullins

Mullins is a small town in Marion County, which was once a thriving tobacco center and a railroad hub. However, the town has been suffering from the decline of these industries, as well as high crime rates, low incomes, and poor education. The town has a median household income of $21,250, which is less than half of the national average. The town also has a high violent crime rate of 1,224 per 100,000 people, which is more than four times the national average. The town’s public schools are also among the lowest performing in the state, with low test scores and graduation rates. The town has lost 7.8% of its population from 2010 to 2019.

6. Orangeburg

Orangeburg is the county seat of Orangeburg County, which is home to several historically black colleges and universities. However, the town has also been facing high crime rates, low incomes, and racial tensions. The town has a median household income of $28,298, which is well below the national average. The town also has a high violent crime rate of 1,017 per 100,000 people, which is more than three times the national average. The town’s racial composition is also highly polarized, with 75% of the population being black and 22% being white. The town has lost 7.6% of its population from 2010 to 2019.

7. Walterboro

Walterboro is the county seat of Colleton County, which is known for its natural beauty and historic charm. However, the town has also been dealing with high crime rates, low incomes, and poor education. The town has a median household income of $25,430, which is less than half of the national average. The town also has a high violent crime rate of 1,143 per 100,000 people, which is more than four times the national average. The town’s public schools are also among the lowest performing in the state, with low test scores and graduation rates. The town has lost 7.4% of its population from 2010 to 2019.

Conclusion

These seven South Carolina towns are examples of places that people are leaving in search of better living conditions. They are facing various challenges such as high crime rates, low incomes, poor education, and environmental issues. These factors have resulted in population declines and economic stagnation. These towns need more investment, development, and support to overcome their problems and revitalize their communities. Otherwise, they may continue to lose their residents and their potential.

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